Tarantula Nebula  
  When I see this, I am in full-out agape awe. The sheer wonderment…  
  "Explanation:  The largest, most violent star forming region known in the whole  Local Group of galaxies  lies in our neighboring galaxy the  Large Magellanic Cloud  (LMC). Were the Tarantula Nebula at the distance of the  Orion Nebula  — a local star forming region — it would take up fully half the sky. Also called  30 Doradus , the red and pink gas indicates a massive  emission nebula , although  supernova remnants  and  dark nebula  also exist there. The bright knot of stars  left of center  is called  R136  and contains many of the most massive, hottest, and brightest stars known. The  above image  is one of the largest mosaics ever created by  observations  of the  Hubble Space Telescope  and has revealed unprecedented details of this enigmatic star forming region.  The image  is being released to celebrate the  22nd anniversary  of Hubble’s launch.” 
  Image Credit:  NASA ,  ESA ,  ESO ,  D. Lennon  (ESA/STScI)  et al. , and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)  
 via  n-a-s-a 's astronomy picture of the day (apod)

Tarantula Nebula 

When I see this, I am in full-out agape awe. The sheer wonderment…

"Explanation: The largest, most violent star forming region known in the whole Local Group of galaxies lies in our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Were the Tarantula Nebula at the distance of the Orion Nebula — a local star forming region — it would take up fully half the sky. Also called 30 Doradus, the red and pink gas indicates a massive emission nebula, although supernova remnants and dark nebula also exist there. The bright knot of stars left of center is called R136 and contains many of the most massive, hottest, and brightest stars known. The above image is one of the largest mosaics ever created by observations of the Hubble Space Telescope and has revealed unprecedented details of this enigmatic star forming region. The image is being released to celebrate the 22nd anniversary of Hubble’s launch.”

Image Credit: NASAESAESOD. Lennon (ESA/STScI) et al., and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

via n-a-s-a's astronomy picture of the day (apod)